Choosing a great dane puppy breeder

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This article offers advice on finding a reputable Great Dane puppy breeder.

Finding a reputable Great Dane puppy breeder can be a time-consuming task, especially if it is done right. Not unlike a marriage, you bring in a new family member that you must love and care for, in sickness and in health, in good times, and those moments that are filled with frustrations. It is worthwhile in the long run to do some research before, so there are no long-term regrets to deal with afterward.

What is the breed history of the Great Dane?

The Great Dane’s origins can be traced back to ancient Egypt. There have been drawings found that resemble the royal looking dog dated as far back as 3,000 B.C. There is a debate to whether they originated in the land of Tibet (due to there similarities with the native Tibetan Mastiff) or with a more German influence where they are known as ‘Deutsche Dogge’ (translating to ‘German Dog’ in English) up until this very day.

great dane

What some of the breed characteristics associated with the Great Dane?

Great Dane’s are considered to be gentle, kind dogs that get along well with children and other animals despite there intimidating appearance. Because of their massive size, you would assume that more space is needed to keep them happy yet they are known to be just as content curled up by there owner’s feet in front of a small fire as they are running free through acres of land.

But, just like humans, every dog has its own unique personality and there are as many different types of temperaments with them as any other animal. This is one of the reasons it is so important to find a knowledgeable breeder. An honest breeder that has experience will not breed a dog that has an abrasive personality. Even with two docile parents, it is probable to have a stronger-willed offspring. (Look at your children or friends to affirm this.) You will have the responsibility to raise them to be the kind of pet you want, much like your own child.

How do I find a reputable Great Dane puppy breeder?

The best way of going about doing this is to ask around. Contact a local AKC group for referrals and be prepared to interview a lot of different people. Here are some tips when searching:

1.)Do your homework. Have questions ready to test the breeder’s knowledge about as well as their passion for the animals that they are breeding.

2.) ask to see papers and references from past customers.

3.)Be prepared to answer a few questions yourself as well as provide your own references. Learn everything you can about the breed and the training that is required in owning a Great Dane. Do not be offended when the breeder asks for these things as they are doing nothing more than protecting the animals they love. They want to make sure that the dog(s) will be going Finding a reputable Great Dane puppy breeder can be a time-consuming task, especially if it is done right. Not unlike a marriage, you bring in a new family member that you must love and care for, in sickness and in health, in good times, and those moments that are filled with frustrations. It is worthwhile in the long run to do some research before, so there are no long-term regrets to deal with afterward.

What is the breed history of the Great Dane?

The Great Dane’s origins can be traced back to ancient Egypt. There have been drawings found that resemble the royal looking dog dated as far back as 3,000 B.C. There is a debate to whether they originated in the land of Tibet (due to there similarities with the native Tibetan Mastiff) or with a more German influence where they are known as ‘Deutsche Dogge’ (translating to ‘German Dog’ in English) up until this very day.

What some of the breed characteristics associated with the Great Dane?

Great Dane’s are considered to be gentle, kind dogs that get along well with children and other animals despite there intimidating appearance. Because of their massive size, you would assume that more space is needed to keep them happy yet they are known to be just as content curled up by there owner’s feet in front of a small fire as they are running free through acres of land.

But, just like humans, every dog has its own unique personality and there are as many different types of temperaments with them as any other animal. This is one of the reasons it is so important to find a knowledgeable breeder. An honest breeder that has experience will not breed a dog that has an abrasive personality. Even with two docile parents, it is probable to have a stronger-willed offspring. (Look at your children or friends to affirm this.) You will have the responsibility to raise them to be the kind of pet you want, much like your own child.

How do I find a reputable Great Dane puppy breeder?

The best way of going about doing this is to ask around. Contact a local AKC group for referrals and be prepared to interview a lot of different people. Here are some tips when searching:

1.) Do your homework. Have questions ready to test the breeder’s knowledge about as well as their passion for the animals that they are breeding.

2.) Ask to see papers and references from past customers.

3.) Be prepared to answer a few questions yourself as well as provide your own references. Learn everything you can about the breed and the training that is required in owning a Great Dane. Do not be offended when the breeder asks for these things as they are doing nothing more than protecting the animals they love. They want to make sure that the dog(s) will be going to a home that will take care of them as well as they have.

4.) Ask for a tour of the establishment. But do not let your judgment become cloudy at the sight of the adorable little puppies. Look instead for any older dogs that are housed there. Almost any breeder (unless they are brand new) will have dogs that they were not able to sell because of health issues or just the lack of eligible buyers. If you do not see any dogs past the juvenile stage, it is advisable to go elsewhere for your puppy. This is usually a sign that the profitless animals were destroyed and you do not want to buy from a person that does not respect and love the dogs that they are breeding.

5.) Do not under any circumstances buy a puppy from the first person you meet. A reputable breeder expects you to think things over and shop around a bit before deciding on them.

According to general consensus, you should avoid pet stores (when it comes to buying a puppy) and breeders that sell to them altogether. These breeders run what are known as ‘puppy mills’ and they are not respected in the industry at all. They breed dogs for nothing but pure profit and could care less where these poor animals end up.


In closing I would like to add that, if you are tempted to get a puppy from a pet store, just to ‘rescue it’; there is a better way to help in this area. You will not know of any genetic problems that might creep up or the temperament of its parents. If you feel you must do something, then contact an ‘Great Dane Rescue Program’ (many cities have local branches) and consider adopting an older dog. The added bonus to this is that they are usually already trained and have had a complete veterinarian work-up. I know it’s hard to walk past the ‘puppy in the window’ but the only way to stop the inhumane business is to cut off the profit of those exploiting it.
to a home that will take care of them as well as they have.

4.)Ask for a tour of the establishment. But do not let your judgment become cloudy at the sight of the adorable little puppies. Look instead for any older dogs that are housed there. Almost any breeder (unless they are brand new) will have dogs that they were not able to sell because of health issues or just the lack of eligible buyers. If you do not see any dogs past the juvenile stage, it is advisable to go elsewhere for your puppy. This is usually a sign that the profitless animals were destroyed and you do not want to buy from a person that does not respect and love the dogs that they are breeding.

5.)Do not under any circumstances buy a puppy from the first person you meet. A reputable breeder expects you to think things over and shop around a bit before deciding on them.

According to general consensus, you should avoid pet stores (when it comes to buying a puppy) and breeders that sell to them altogether. These breeders run what are known as ‘puppy mills’ and they are not respected in the industry at all. They breed dogs for nothing but pure profit and could care less where these poor animals end up.


In closing I would like to add that, if you are tempted to get a puppy from a pet store, just to ‘rescue it’; there is a better way to help in this area. You will not know of any genetic problems that might creep up or the temperament of its parents. If you feel you must do something, then contact an ‘Great Dane Rescue Program’ (many cities have local branches) and consider adopting an older dog. The added bonus to this is that they are usually already trained and have had a complete veterinarian work-up. I know it’s hard to walk past the ‘puppy in the window’ but the only way to stop the inhumane business is to cut off the profit of those exploiting it.