Livestock guardian dog breeds

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In 1983, the Herding group was established, prior to the formation of this category, herding dogs where classed as working dogs. Although in view of their abilities and unique type of work, these dogs earned themselves a subcategory of their own.

The instincts of a rated herd dog are that of a modified variation of predatory behavior. A herding dog will accept responsibility for the entire herd as its sees them as belonging to him.

A dog whose purpose is to guard sheep is not the same as a herding dog, although it’s often looked on as similar behavior. The sole responsibility of a herding dog is to keep the flock together, and to move on as instructed. If a predator is noticed, it will defend against a attack, but isn’t likely to be the one to make the first move.

The technique to herd sheep can differ with each individual breed. A Border collie for instance, might head off the flock by staring down in an aim to achieve dominance. While a Australian Cattle dog is known for following a herd and nipping at the heels of the rear flock members, and resulted in the nickname of ‘heeler’ being given. Other breeds, might take a more direct approach and attempt to jump on a herd back to entice movement.

All three methods can be just as effective with the ideal training and suitable dog, with the methods known as back, heel, and head.

   
Shiba Inu
Saarlooswolfhond
Mcnab
Mcnab
Bouvier Des Flanders
Bouvier Des Flanders
Bearded Collie
Bearded Collie
Entlebucher Sennenhund
Entlebucher Sennenhund
Polish Lowland Sheepdog
Polish Lowland Sheepdog
Australian Cattle
American Staffordshire Terrier
Mudi
Mudi
Swedish Elkhound
Swedish Elkhound
Lancashire Heeler
Lancashire Heeler
Bouvier Des Flanders
Bouvier Des Flanders
Icelandic Sheepdog
Icelandic Sheepdog
Pumi
Pumi
Border Collie
Border Collie
Puli
Puli
Australian Stumpy Tail Cattle
Australian Cattle
Catahoula Bulldog
Catahoula Bulldog
Briard
Briard
Berger Des Picard
Berger Des Picard
Belgian Shepherd Tervuren
Belgian Shepherd Tervuren
Catalan Sheepdog
Catalan Sheepdog
Catahoula Leopard
Catahoula Leopard
Catalan Sheepdog
Catalan Sheepdog
Miniature Australian Shepherd
Miniature Australian Shepherd
English Shepherd
English Shepherd
Border Collie
Border Collie
Saluki
Australian Kelpie
Pembroke Welsh Corgi
Pembroke Welsh Corgi
Pyrenean Mastiff
Belgian Shepherd Laekenois
Belgian Shepherd Laekenois
Bergamasco
Bergamasco
Belgian Shepherd Laekenois
Belgian Shepherd Laekenois
Sealyham Terrier
Shetland Sheepdog
German Shepherd
German Shepherd
Beauceron
Beauceron
Belgian Shepherd Malinois
Belgian Shepherd Malinois

The size of a particular herding dog is all related to size of its flock. A Welsh corgi, a small member of the herding dogs, where bred short, so able to avoid being kicked or trampled. A larger breed if required might be able to protect its herd if a predator should appear.

 

Australian Cattle Dogs, Shetland Sheepdogs, and Border Collies are all agile and quick for moving around a flock to get a straggler or two moving back in the ideal direction. Sheep and cattle are animals commonly herded, although poultry herding is known of, as well as reindeer controlled with herd dogs.

Physical appearance or characteristics of a herding dog is often related to its specific duties. For instance, a dog to operate in areas of coyote or wolf attacks is more in need of a strong, large dog with a thick coat. Weather extremes are a further consideration.

Herding dogs are seen as some of the more intelligent breeds in the dog kingdom. Border Collies and Collies are well suited to herding large flocks of livestock. Response time to commands is quick and often able to anticipate movements in a herd or individual animals. These dogs are perfectly suited to take on agility trails and obedience competitions.

The overall package – intelligence, patience, and physical appearance make these dogs perfect family pets. Although, some of the dogs might attempt to herd other family pets or small children, which can all be an interesting watch.

As household companions, a herding dog is inclined to check on unusual noises, or a hiss of a cat or a crying child. These dogs can be extremely gentle to offer a endearing quality.

Exercise routines for these dogs often vary with breed, although with their high intelligence levels these dogs are in need of frequent interaction. A dog able to learn tricks and obedience commands with ease. With their quick minds, able to excel in agility trails and often more content when given a task or duty to perform.